Wednesday
Feb222017

Celebrate Zelda! week in Asheville NC ~ March 10-14, 2017



Free. Ongoing All Evening. Come Anytime!


On the anniversary of the death of Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, and as part of an ongoing project Celebrating Dead Writers: the afterlife of the written word, Monika Gross of At-A-Site Theater will be offering intimate one-to-one readings of Zelda's published works.

Attendees will be invited to choose from a menu of selections and then enjoy a short 1 to 3 minute reading. Participants may then pick a "memorial" card to take away with them from a collection of cards with quotes by Ms. Fitzgerald. 

For other events that are part of the 2017 Celebrate Zelda! week, go to: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/247202229053355/

Sunday
Aug302015

At-A-Site Theater Artistic Director, Monika Gross, a 2016 NC Artist Fellowship Recipient

I am honored and very pleased to be a recipient of a 2016 North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship for Playwriting.

Thank you to the NC Arts Council and to the National Endowment for the Arts, which delegated the federal funds for these fellowship awards!

 

Press Releases

Eighteen Artists Receive NC Arts Council Artist Fellowship

Author: hearp/Wednesday, August 12, 2015/Categories: Headlines, Press Releases

Raleigh, N.C. (August 11, 2015) — Thirteen literary artists, three composers and two songwriters have been awarded North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowships for 2015–16.

The North Carolina Arts Council recognizes individual artists for excellence and achievement within their art forms or traditions. This recognition comes in the form of Artist Fellowships and through the North Carolina Heritage Award program.

More than 260 artists from across the state submitted applications for the 18 fellowship awards.

In the literary category the following artists will receive fellowships: Julie Funderburk, poetry  (Charlotte); Ann Lena Phillips Bell poetry (Wilmington); Sheila Webster Boneham, prose (Wilmington); Abigail DeWitt, prose (Burnsville); Alina “Tita” Ramirez, prose (Greensboro); David Joy, prose  (Cashiers); Lee Zacharias, prose (Greensboro); Wiley Cash, prose (Wilmington); Kim Church, prose (Raleigh); and Drew Perry, prose (Greensboro).

Two artists received fellowships for screenwriting: Sally Vacca (Statesville) and Laura DeBar (Durham). Monika Gross (Asheville) received a fellowship in the playwright category.

Composers that received fellowships include: Brandon J. Lee (Greensboro), Dr. Alejandro H. Rutty (Greensboro); and N. Cameron Britt (Raleigh).

In the songwriting category two artist received fellowships: Silas Durocher (Asheville) and Django Haskins (Durham).

Artists receive a fellowship of $10,000 to support creative development and the creation of new work. Recipients were selected by panels comprised of artists and arts professionals with expertise in each discipline.

For additional information, including related photography or videos, story ideas or more please contact:

Rebecca Moore, Senior Program Director, Marketing
(919) 807-6530; Rebecca.Moore@ncdcr.gov

http://www.ncarts.org/AboutUs/PressReleases/TabId/3272/ArtMID/9122/ArticleID/1592/Eighteen-Artists-Receive-NC-Arts-Council-Artist-Fellowship.aspx

 

 

 

 

ARTIST PROFILE

 

"I like to make theater with 'uptown' and 'downtown' timing," says playwright Monika Gross. "With the 'hook' of mainstream theater and the free fall of the avant-garde, mixing traditional and contemporary, simple stories and complex layers. In that space both audience and artist can have an entertaining, meaningful, and challenging experience on whatever level they wish to engage."

Monika grew up in Asheville and Chapel Hill, earned her BFA from UNCSA, moved to NYC for thirty years, and returned to Asheville in 2010. While in NYC, she was artistic director of Theaterworkers and Smarty Pants Theatre. In Asheville, she currently develops work through At-A-Site Theater. "Our mission is to create theater in unexpected places, theater in familiar places in unusual ways, theater and audience meeting unexpectedly," she explains. "With the constant stimuli of our digital days, theater is the intervention that allows us to take time to give meaning to space. Theater is the space I like to hope in public."

Monika admires the work of Caryl Churchill, Timberlake Wertenbaker, Carson Kreitzer and the female wits of the early 1800s. "Women playwrights in Restoration London supported one another. 21st century women playwrights are doing this again. As a female theater professional you face harsh realities. Less work in general and less well-paid and prestigious work in particular. My strategy has always been to see myself as a Theater Artist, 'writing' my theater from the inside and the outside, as a playwright, adaptor, director, performer. I try to find creative ways to be in that theater space I love so much."

Monika's playmaking is influenced by early training with Joseph Chaikin, members of Peter Brook's company, and Ariane Mnouchine and Theatre du Soleil. She imbibed the creative process of Charles Ludlam and the Ridiculous Theatrical Company as well as Polish theater artist Tadeusz Kantor's memory pieces.

Monika's residencies include Hedgebrook writer's colony for her full-length play "Report on the Rainforest," which was further developed at the O'Neill Puppetry Conference as well as at 7 Stages in Atlanta; and a residency in Minneapolis with 3 Legged Race for her adaptation of Irene Beckerman's "Love, Loss & What I Wore". Her NYC site-specific piece, "Grandmothers Information Project," was supported by a grant from Dancing in the Streets. Her adaptations from literature include "Chekhov's Last Story" (Anton Chekhov), "The Spirit of Service" (Luigi Pirandello), and "Mortal Love" (Edna O'Brien).

 

Saturday
Jul042015

Fourth of July American Writers! "Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers" @ Ooh La La Market in Pritchard Park, Saturday, July 4!

Summer 2015  of

Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers

Happy Fourth of July!

to

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-64)


and

Stephen Foster (1826-64)

 

Come celebrate their birthdays and enjoy being read to!

Look for At-A-Site Theater today at the

Ooh La La Market  

Pritchard Park  

Saturday, July 4, 2015   

        10:00am - 4:00pm  

 

 

 

Thursday
Jun042015

Opening Day for Summer 2015 season of "Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers" @ Ooh La La Market in Pritchard Park, Saturday, June 6!

At-A-Site Theater presents

CELEBRATING THE BIRTHDAYS OF DEAD WRITERS

An Intimate Street Theater Performance honoring the Afterlife of the Written Word

We live again when the words we wrote are read aloud to you, the Listener

Come find Monika Gross of At-A-Site Theater at the Ooh La La Curiosity Market in Pritchard Park, Saturday, June 6 from 10am to 3pm, and pick a brief selection from the day's tempting menu of Dead Writers:

 

 

 

  • Poet Laureate & Pulitzer Prize winner Maxine Kumin (1925-2014)

 

  • Nobel Prize-winning German novelist Thomas Mann (1875-1955)

 

  • Russian short story writer and poet, Alexandr Pushkin (1799-1837)
  • French playwright Pierre Corneille (1606-1684)


The choice is up to you, the Listener...

 

“Books are people, people who have managed to stay alive by hiding between the covers of a book.”     E.B. White

 

“When writers die they become books, which is, after all, not too bad an incarnation."     Jorge Luis Borges

 

Tuesday
May262015

En Garde Arts: Inspirational Site-Specific Theater from 1985-99 Comes Back in 2014!

 

Anne Hamburger was a mentor and inspiration for me in the 1980s during my time as artistic director of Theaterworkers in New York City. She moved on to be artistic director of La Jolla Playhouse, and then was an Executive Vice President at Disney. I'm happy to report she is "back on the site" with a new incarnation of En Garde Arts and their inagural production of "BASETRACK Live" (2014). What will she be doing next???  CLICK HERE to find out about their exciting projects for 2015-16!

From her Bio on the En Garde Arts website: "Founded by Anne Hamburger, En Garde Arts was the leader of the site-specific theatre movement in New York City, developing iconoclastic theatrical productions in the 80s and 90s with many of downtown’s most visionary artists including Chuck Mee, Anne Bogart and Tina Landau. In 2014, the organization made a powerful return to New York with its inaugural production BASETRACK Live, named one of the top ten productions of 2014 by The New York Times. The production’s tour has already traveled to 25 cities across the country.

Anne Hamburger was recently awarded an Exceptional Merit in Media Award from the National Political Women’s Caucus and has been named “a person to watch in 2015″ by The Wall Street Journal. En Garde’s past productions have been honored with six OBIEs, two Drama Desk Awards and an Outer Critics Circle Award. In 1999, she became an Executive Vice President at Disney, where she led the creative development and production of all the major stage shows for the parks worldwide. For the first time in Disney’s history, she brought in renowned theatrical artists to create Broadway caliber theatre. Many of the shows developed under her tenure are still running today." 

Thursday
Apr302015

Celebrating Two Birthdays! SciFi Writer Jack Williamson (1908-2006), and the Crow and Quill's 1st Year (2014-15)!

April 29, 2015

Crow and Quill

106 N. Lexington Street

Asheville NC

10:00pm - Midnight

 

Friday
Apr102015

Judith Malina: June 4, 1926 - April 10, 2015

In Memoriam

The Queen is Dead

Long live "The Living"


JUDITH MALINA

June 4, 1926 - April 10, 2015


 


The Melancholy Life of Woman

When first she learns she learns
That she is not a boy,
And sooner or later
It is borne in upon her
That she is a girl.

She is sooner or later taught
That this has excruciating
Advantages and excruciating
Disadvantages and
That she must fight.

She more or less understands
That the greatest of these
Is submission, and sooner or later
She submits more or less.

She uses with patience and prurience
The excrutiating alternatives.
She is afraid and wants
To become a woman and she becomes
A woman and she is afraid
Of being a woman.

She more or less chooses, but more
Often than not, is chosen, by one
Or by several men, who become
Her protectors, destroyers, husbands,
And lovers, who fulfil for better or worse
The degrees of whatever goes on
Between woman and man.

Sometimes her body opens
And lets out the child.
Often her body is wracked
With unavoidable pain.
But more often than not
It is wracked with avoidable pain.

Rarely or often or never or always
A man
Enters her body
For hundreds of motives
Than which hers are all different,
Except love
Which she more or less seeks
And more or less finds.

Then when she has suffered enough,
And bled and not bled,
And birthed or aborted and cried
Or not cried, from bridal’s gown
To widow’s weeds she learns
When she is tired she learns
That she is old.

All of it sooner or later
Over too soon or over
Too late, and she learns
To submit to the life
That an old women more or less lives.
In a world that despises old women
She learns to submit
To a more or less life
That she never deserved,
Or else she dies young.

Judith Malina


The Living Theatre: Our mission

 

To call into question
who we are to each other in the social environment of the theater,
to undo the knots
that lead to misery,
to spread ourselves
across the public's table
like platters at a banquet,
to set ourselves in motion
like a vortex that pulls the
spectator into action,
to fire the body's secret engines,
to pass through the prism
and come out a rainbow,
to insist that what happens in the jails matters,
to cry "Not in my name!"
at the hour of execution,
to move from the theater to the street and from the street to the
theater.
This is what The Living Theatre does today.
It is what it has always done

- Julian Beck

 


Monday
Mar092015

March 8, 1965-2015 marks the 50th Anniversary of the arrival of the first combat troops in Vietnam

March 8, 2015 marks the 50th Anniversary of the arrival of the first US combat troops in Vietnam. This poem of Denise Levertov's from her collection "To Stay Alive" (1971) offers us a poignant means to reflect.

 

Tenebrae
by Denise Levertov (Fall 1967)


Heavy, heavy, heavy, hand and heart.
We are at war,
bitterly, bitterly at war.

And the buying and selling
buzzes in our heads, a swarm
of busy flies, a kind of innocence.

Gowns of gold sequins are fitted,
sharp-glinting. What harsh rustlings
of silver moiré there are,
to remind me of shrapnel splinters.

And weddings are held in full solemnity
not of desire but of etiquette,
the nuptial pomp of starched lace;
a grim innocence.

And picnic parties return from the beaches
burning with stored sun in the dusk;
children promised a TV show when they get home
fall asleep in the backs of a million station wagons,
sand in their hair, the sound of waves
quietly persistent at their ears.
They are not listening.

Their parents at night
dream and forget their dreams.
They wake in the dark
and make plans. Their sequin plans
glitter into tomorrow.
They buy, they sell.

They fill freezers with food.
Neon signs flash their intentions
into the years ahead.

And at their ears the sound
of the war. They are
not listening, not listening.

Monday
Nov102014

At-A-Site Theater Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers - Kurt Vonnegut, November 11, 2014

We live again when the words we wrote are read out loud to you, the listener


NOVEMBER 11, 2014

KURT VONNEGUT (1922-2007)

 

OUTDOOR & INDOOR READINGS for Veteran's Day..

Outdoor Location: 

Downtown Asheville NC

12:00am-3:00pm &  6:00pm-9:00pm

Either near Posano's in Pack Square  map link
or the "Iron" sculpture at Wall St & Battery Park Ave   map link
or Haywood Street near Malaprops map link 
or at the corner of North Lexington Ave & Walnut St map link

 

Indoor Location: 

The Crow & Quill 106 N Lexington Ave

9:00pm - 10:30pm

 

Passersby are invited to chose from a menu of 2-to-3-minute passages or short random quotes from the works of America's perhaps greatest and certainly darkist satirist, Kurt Vonnegut. Their chosen selection will then be read out loud to the passerby.

Kurt Vonnegut wrote numerous novels and non-fiction essays and seldom if ever pulled a literary punch, particularly later in life in his scathing condemnation of US policies and the Bush Administration, A Man Without A Country. He penned terms and quotes that have become part of our collective consciousness, such as:  "So it goes," "Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt," and "God damn it, babies, you've got to be kind." Also the unforgettable “Why don't you take a flying fuck at a rolling doughnut? Why don't you take a flying fuck at the mooooooooooooon?” from Slapstick...

As a WWII US soldier, he was a prisoner of war in Dresden during the infamous Allied fire-bombings between February 13-15, 1945, and as a POW, he was enlisted by the Germans to then assist in managing the thousands of incinerated remains of civilian men, women and children. He was 22 years old. Vonnegut returned to this experience many times in his writing, most memorably in his novel Slaughterhouse-Five. The title came from the name of the meat locker where he and his fellow POWs were held.

More information about Kurt Vonnegut can be found at Wikipedia or at the official Kurt Vonnegut website.

 

     “No wonder kids grow up crazy. A cat's cradle is nothing but a bunch of X's between somebody's hands, and little kids look and look and look at all those X's . . ."
      "And?"
      "No damn cat, and no damn cradle.”

- from "Cat's Cradle" (1963)


 

WWII photo of Vonnegut as young soldier

“And on the subject of burning books: I want to congratulate librarians, not famous for their physical strength or their powerful political connections or their great wealth, who, all over this country, have staunchly resisted anti-democratic bullies who have tried to remove certain books from their shelves, and have refused to reveal to thought police the names of persons who have checked out those titles.

So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House or the Supreme Court or the Senate or the House of Representatives or the media. The America I love still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.”

from "A Man Without A Country" (2005)

 

Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007)

Friday
Nov072014

At-A-Site Theater Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers - and the Un-Dead! - Bram Stoker, November 8, 2014 @ The Crow & Quill

SPECIAL!!

At-A-Site Theater's  

CELEBRATING THE BIRTHDAYS OF DEAD WRITERS

(We live again when the words we wrote are read out loud to you, the listener)

Celebrates the birthday of THE UN-DEAD, too!

Bram Stoker (1847-1912)

November 8, 2014

 

Location:   The Crow & Quill  106 N. Lexington Avenue  Asheville NC  MAP LINK

Time:   10:30pm - MIDNIGHT

Patrons are invited to chose from selections from this Iriish novelist and short story writer, whose unique novel Dracula, continues to be a haunting bestseller.

Donations will be gratefully accepted.

 


What I saw was the Count’s head coming out from the window. ... my very feeling changed to repulsion and terror when I saw the whole man slowly emerge from the widow and begin to crawl down the castle wall over that dreadful abyss, face down, with his cloak spreading out around him like great wings. ... I saw the fingers and toes grasp the corners of the stones, worn clear of the mortar by the stress of years, and by thus using every projection and inequality move downwards with considerable speed, just as a lizard moves along a wall."

from "Dracula"

 

ALSO, MARK YOUR CALENDARS:

Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers: the afterlife of the written word celebrates the birthday of:

KURT VONNEGUT (1922-2007) @ THE CROW & QUILL

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 from 9:00pm-11:00pm

Friday
Nov072014

At-A-Site Theater Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers - Margaret Mitchell, November 8, 2014 @ The Crow & Quill

SPECIAL!!

At-A-Site Theater's  

CELEBRATING THE BIRTHDAYS OF DEAD WRITERS

(We live again when the words we wrote are read out loud to you, the listener)

Celebrates the birthday of

Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949)

November 8, 2014

 

Location:   The Crow & Quill  106 N. Lexington Avenue  Asheville NC  MAP LINK

Time:   10:30pm - MIDNIGHT

Patrons are invited to chose from selections from this Southern novelist whose novel Gone With the Wind, continues to stand as the classic pageturner about the Civil War, and Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler arguably the two most popular and unforgettable Southern fictional characters.

Donations will be gratefully accepted.

 

 The premier of the film "Gone With the Wind" Atlanta GA 1939

"He was a dashing figure and one that people turned to look at. He spent money freely, rode a wild black stallion, and wore clothes which were always the height of style and tailoring. The latter in itself was enough to attract attention to him, for the uniforms of the soldiers were dingy and worn now and the civilians, even when turned out in their best, showed skillful patching and darning. Scarlett thought she had never seen such elegant pants as he wore, fawn colored, shepherd's plaid, and checked. As for his waistcoats, they were indescribably handsome, especially the white watered-silk one with tiny rosebuds embroidered on it. And he wore these garments with a still more elegant air as though unaware of their glory."

from "Gone With the Wind"

Thursday
Oct022014

At-A-Site Theater Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers returns! for Thomas Wolfe's Birthday - October 3

We live again when the words we wrote are read out loud to you, the listener


OCTOBER 3, 2014

Thomas Wolfe (1900-1938)


Location:  Downtown Asheville NC

Time: 11:00am-2:00pm

Either near Posano's in Pack Square  map link
or the "Iron" sculpture at Wall St & Battery Park Ave   map link
or Haywood Street near Malaprops map link 
or at the corner of North Lexington Ave & Walnut St map link

 

&  6:00pm-10:00pm

Same sites as above,
or near Wicked Weed and Mamacita's on Biltmore Ave map link

 

Passersby are invited to chose from a menu of 2-to-3-minute passages or short random quotes from the works of Asheville's own Thomas Wolfe. Their chosen selection will then be read out loud to the passerby.

Wolfe wrote four lengthy novels (famously edited by the patient Max Perkins at Scribners), plus many short stories, dramatic works and novellas.

 

From Wikipedia: "(In 1926) Wolfe ... began writing the first version of an autobiographical novel entitled O Lost. The narrative, which evolved into Look Homeward, Angel, fictionalized his early experiences in Asheville, and chronicled family, friends, and the boarders at his mother's establishment on Spruce Street. In the book, he renamed the town Altamont and called the boarding house "Dixieland." His family's surname became Gant, and Wolfe called himself Eugene, his father Oliver, and his mother Eliza. The original manuscript of O Lost was over 1100 pages (333,000 words) long, and considerably more experimental in style than the final version of Look Homeward, Angel.

It was submitted to Scribner's, where the editing was done by Maxwell Perkins, the most prominent book editor of the time, who also worked with Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. He cut the book to focus more on the character of Eugene, a stand-in for Wolfe.  Wolfe initially expressed gratitude to Perkins for his disciplined editing, but he had misgivings later. It has been said that Wolfe found a father figure in Perkins, and that Perkins, who had five daughters, found in Wolfe a sort of foster son."

Wolfe influenced the writings of the Beat authors, of Ray Bradbury, of Philip Roth, and many, many others. He was one of the first masters of the genre of autobiographical fiction and is considered North Carolina’s most famous writer.

More information about Thomas Wolfe can be found at Wikipedia or at the Thomas Wolfe Society. Here is information about visiting the Thomas Wolfe House Memorial in Asheville.

 

     Only the darkness moved about him as he lay there thinking, feeling in the darkness: a door creaked softly in the house.

"October is the season for returning: the bowels of youth are yearning with lost love. Their mouths are dry and bitter with desire: their hearts are torn with the thorns of spring. For lovely April, cruel and flowerful, will tear them with sharp joy and wordless lust. Spring has no language but a cry; but crueller than April is the asp of time.


"October is the season for returning: even the town is born anew." he thought. "The tide of life is at the full again, the rich return to business or to fashion, and the bodies of the poor are rescued out of heat and weariness. The ruin and horror of the summer is forgotten---a memory of hot cells and humid walls, a hell of ugly sweat and labor and distress and hopelessness, a limbo of pale greasy faces. Now joy and hope have revived again in the hearts of millions of people, they breathe the air again with hunger, their movements are full of life and energy. The mark of their summer's suffering is still legible upon their flesh, there is something starved and patient in their eyes, and a look that has a child's hope and expectation in it.

"All things on earth point home in old October: sailors to sea, travellers to walls and fences, hunters to field and hollow and the long voice of the hounds, the lover to the love he has forsaken--all things that live upon this earth return: Father, will you not, too, come back again? ...
Come to us, Father, while the winds howl in the darkness, for October has come again bringing with it huge prophecies of death and life and the great cargo of the men who will return. For we are ruined, lost, and broken if you do not come, and our lives, like rotten chips, are whirled about us onward in darkness to the sea."


So, thinking, feeling, speaking, he lay there in his mother's house, but there was nothing in the house but silence, and the moving darkness: storm shook the house and huge winds rushed upon them, and he knew then that his father would not come again, and that all the life that he had known was now lost and broken as a dream.


from "Of Time and the River"

 

 

Friday
Sep262014

At-A-Site Theater presents "We reaving / Denise Levertov + Robert Duncan" -- Saturday, September 27 @ 1:30pm

TODAY!

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 @ 1:30PM

 

We    reaving

A theatrical COMPOSITION BY FIELD of the co-respondence 

between/ 

denise levertov          +           robert duncan

 

                                                                           

 

Material Presented at the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center 2014 Conference:

ReVIEWING 6: The Writers of Black Mountain College


Saturday, September 27, 2014 @ 1:30pm - 3:00pm

Information and Registration

 

“All the accumulated weight of their years of intimate and shared trust invests with excruciating poignancy and force the final barrage of letters in which they stood, toe to toe, and battled it out till their long friendship lay in irreparable ruins about them.”

from the introduction by Albert Gelpi to "The Letters of Robert Duncan and Denise Levertov"

Thursday
Sep112014

At-A-Site Theater Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers returns! for Asheville's own O. Henry, September 11

SEPTEMBER 11, 2014

O. Henry (William Sydney Porter) (1862-1910)


Location:  Downtown Asheville NC

Time: 2:30pm - 4:30pm 

&  7:30pm - 10:30pm

On the corner of North Lexington Ave & Walnut St map link 

or near Wicked Weed and Mamacita's on Biltmore Ave map link

 or near Malaprops on Haywood St map link 

(Please note:  The Reader may occasionally need to move to an alternative site because of weather or other onsite circumstances)

 

Passersby are invited to chose from a menu of short story excerpts by Asheville's own O. Henry. Their selection will then be read out loud to the passerby.

More information about O. Henry can be found at Wikipedia. You can read his stories online at Project Guttenberg.

 

O. Henry's gravestone in Riverside Cemetery, Asheville NC Admiriers of O.Henry often put $1.87 in change on the marker: the amount of coins that Della had managed to save in "The Gift of the Magi" for Jim's Christmas present...“And most wonderful of all are words, and how they make friends one with another, being oft associated, until not even obituary notices them do part.”

from "Whirligigs"

 

 

 

 




“The magi, as you know, were wise men--wonderfully wise men--who brought gifts to the Babe in the manger. They invented the art of giving Christmas presents. Being wise, their gifts were no doubt wise ones, possibly bearing the privilege of exchange in case of duplication. And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. O all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi.”

 

 “If a person has lived through war, poverty and love, he has lived a full life.”

 

video clip from "O. Henry's Full House" (1952) - "The Cop and the Anthem" starring Charles Laughton and with Marilyn Monroe (Narrator: John Steinbeck!)

Wednesday
Sep032014

At-A-Site Theater presents "Butoh-fu: a dance of listening" an intimate onsite theater project, Saturday, September 6

GUEST ARTIST PERFORMANCE


At-A-Site Theater presents


"Butoh-fu: a dance of listening"

Catch the pleasure of transformation through words

100 movements can be no match for one transformation

 



'Butoh-fu' is the name given to the poetic word image notations recorded by butoh dancers to guide and inspire their dances.

Individuals will be invited to randomly select short texts by Kazuo Ohno (1906-2010) and Tatsumi Hijikata (1928-1986), the founders of butoh.


These texts will then be read out loud to the listener as s/he is encouraged to close eyes and experience butoh dance by imagining a physical metamorphosis inspired by the words.


performed @ “Butoh Garden Party”

a family friendly event

a fundraiser for Sara Baird's Anemone Dance Company

Megan Ransmeir Photography by  Sandee Johnson

Saturday, September 6th from 5-7pm

104 Flint Street, Asheville NC  map link

(RAIN DATE: Sunday, September 7th from 5-7pm)
 

Please join us for live music and dance, a silent art auction, and a glass of wine. All proceeds benefit Anemone Dance Theater/Legacy Butoh for the production UWABE – Art in The Park, free dance performances in Asheville parks this fall. 

Suggested donation is $20.

 
Enjoy live performances with dancers and musicians 
Jenni Cockrell, Elisa Faires, Julie Becton Gillum, Monika Gross, Geo Lynx, Erik Moellering, Kima Moore, and Megan Ransmeier 
as well as a silent art auction and exhibit by Sandee Johnson.
 

 

photo credit:   Dancer - Megan Ransmeir   Photographer -Sandee Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday
Aug302014

FINAL PERFORMANCE TOMORROW, AUGUST 31! "ALL OUR DEAD WRITERS - LIVE!"



AT-A-SITE-THEATER’S 2014 SUMMER PROJECT

“CELEBRATING THE BIRTHDAYS OF DEAD WRITERS”

an intimate street theater project

 

FINAL PERFORMANCE TOMORROW!

"ALL OUR DEAD WRITERS - LIVE!"

SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 2014

@ LEXINGTON AVENUE ARTS & FUN FESTIVAL (LAAFF)

from 4:30pm - 9:00pm

 

Come help us celebrate our success!

 

At-A-Site Theater’s marathon 2014 Summer Project “Celebrating the Birthdays of Dead Writers: the afterlife of the written word” an intimate street theater performance, concludes with an expanded menu of readings including "All Our Dead Writers - Live!" on  our final performance day tomorrow, Sunday, August 31, 2014 from 4:30pm to 9:00pm at the Lexington Avenue Arts & Fun Festival (LAAFF) in downtown Asheville NC.

 


Passersby can choose from an Expanded Menu of All 65 Writers we have read so far this summer!  1-to-2 minute selections by the writer or a brief 30-second “Random Quote" will then be read out loud in a one-to-one person-to-person performance. In the case of any of our dead playwrights, passersby can also choose to read a scene with the Reader. The audience receives a small business-card-sized program that includes a quotation from the writer.

To date, At-A-Site Theater has presented 65 authors across all genres, adult and children’s writers, fiction and non-fiction, plays and poetry, and has read to more than 5000 passersby in Asheville NC, New York City and other towns. 

 

See The Complete List of All 65 Writers to whet your appetite!

 

Look for our At-A-Site Theater Readers Corner

in a quiet nook amidst the swirling festivities, just north or south of  Walnut Street...

  

Monika Gross of At-A-Site Theater celebrated the birthday of children's fantasy writer Diane Wynne Jones @ Shindig on the Green, August 16

 

Saturday
Aug302014

At-A-Site Theater presents a Summer Project Celebrating Birthdays of Dead Writers: William Saroyan, August 31

AUGUST 31, 2014

WILLIAM SAROYAN (1908-1981)


Location:   Downtown Asheville NC @ LAAFF

(Lexington Ave Arts & Fun Festival)

Time:         4:30pm - 9:30pm 

Just north of the corner of North Lexington Ave & Walnut St map link

 

 

 

 Passersby are invited to chose from a menu of works by this American dramatist and novelist who won the Pulitizer Prize for Drama in 1940 and won the Academy Award for Best Story in 1943 for the Hollywood film adaptation made of his novel The Human Comedy starring the then 22 year old Mickey Rooney. (video clip below)

Their selection will then be read out loud to the passerby.

 

 

More information about William Saroyan can be found at Wikipedia and at The William Saroyan Society and at this literary site from Finland. 

  

 

“I’m not going to try to comfort you,” he said. “I know I can’t. Nothing can.

 

But try to remember that a good man can never die.You will see your brother many times again – in the streets, at home, in all the places of the town.

 

The person of man may go, but he best part of hims stays. It stays forever.”

 

from "The Human Comedy"

 


 

 

Lionel & Ullyses in The Library Scene from "The Human Comedy" (1943)

Saturday
Aug302014

At-A-Site Theater presents a Summer Project Celebrating Birthdays of Dead Writers: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, August 30

AUGUST 30, 2014

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT SHELLEY (1797-1851)


Location:   Downtown Asheville NC

Time:         3:30pm - 5:30pm 

Near the corner of North Lexington Ave & Walnut St map link
or Haywood St near Malaprops map link
or near the "Iron" sculpture at Wall St & Battery Park Ave   map link 

Time:         7:00pm - 11:00pm

Near the corner of North Lexington Ave & Walnut St map link 
or near Wicked Weed & Mamacita's on Biltmore Ave map link

 

(Please note:  The Reader may occasionally need to move to an alternative site because of weather or other onsite circumstances)

 

 Passersby are invited to chose from either short quotes or selections from this English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, biographer and essayist, whose unique novel Frankenstein: A Modern Prometheus, written when the author was 18 to 20 years old, is, in the words of J. Paul Hunter: "not only canoncial, but paradigm-breaking and exemplary ... nearly a mastertext for the turn of the twenty-first century."

Their selection will then be read out loud to the passerby.

 

Manuscript from the novel "Frankenstein"More information about Mary Shelley can be found at Wikipedia and at The Poetry Foundation, as well as at a Mary Shelley's Frankenstein "fan" site from New Zealand. You can see a bibliography of all the books she wrote at this Wikipedia site. Read Germaine Greer's op-ed in The Guardian about a brief controversy about the authorship of the novel. You can read the complete text of Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus online. And in particular read Mary's own preface to this 1831 Third Edition to learn the real deal on the story behind how it came to be written and the ins and outs of the bohemian life of Mary, her husband Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Lord Byron in Switzerland in 1816... And read a online facsimile of her marvellous travelogue of their bohemian wanderings, History of a six weeks' tour through a part of France, Switzerland, Germany and Holland: with letters descriptive of a sail round the Lake of Geneva, and of the glaciers of Chamouni (1817) 

At-A-Site Theater celebrated the birthday of Shelley's poet husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley, on August 4, 2014.

 

  

" 'Hateful day when I received life!' I exclaimed in agony. 'Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust? God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemlance. Satan had his companions, fellow-devils, to admire and encourage him; but I am solitary and abhorred.' "

 

 

“With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.”

 

from Frankenstein (1817)


Friday
Aug292014

At-A-Site Theater presents a Summer Project Celebrating Birthdays of Dead Writers: Maurice Maeterlinck, August 29

AUGUST 29, 2014

MAURICE MAETERLINCK (1862-1949)


Location:   Downtown Asheville NC

Time:         6:30pm - 10:30pm

On the corner of North Lexington Ave & Walnut St map link 
or Haywood St near Malaprops map link  
or the "Iron" sculpture at Wall St & Battery Park Ave   map link 
or near Wicked Weed & Mamacita's on Biltmore Ave map link


(Please note:  The Reader may occasionally need to move to an alternative site because of weather or other onsite circumstances)

 

Passersby are invited to chose from a menu of works by this 1911 Nobel Prize winning Belgian playwright, poet and essayist whose play The Blue Bird: A Fairy Play in Six Acts (1908) is a classic of the Symbolist movement in literature, and was staged for its premiere on September 30, 1980 by Constantin Stanislavski in a famous production at the Moscow Art Theater (see photo to the left).

Their selection will then be read out loud to the passerby.

 

In his classic poetic nature study, The Life of the Bee, Maeterlinck wrote: "No living creature, not even man, has achieved in the center of his sphere, what the bee has achieved." When it was first published, a reviewer wrote: "[In his] interest of its complex social life, the unfathomed questions of what these little creatures know and think and feel, the delicate hair line of division between reason and instinct, Maeterlinck has a theme from which he has developed a sort of prose poem full of dreamy yet subtle philosophy of life and life's mysteries."

 

 

 

More information about Maurice Maeterlinck can be found at Wikipedia. You can read his both his book The Life of the Bee and his play The Blue Bird online at Project Guttenberg.

 

 

 

 

TYLTYL So you are not really dead?

GRANDFATHER TYL What do you say? What is he saying? Now he's using words we don't understand. Is it a new word, a new invention?

TYLTYL The word "dead"?

GRANDFATHER TYL Yes, that was the word. What does it mean?

TYLTYL Why, it means that one's no longer alive.

GRANDFATHER TYL How silly they are, up there!

TYLTYL Is it nice here?

GRANDFATHER TYL Oh, yes; not bad, not bad; and, if one could just have a smoke.

from "The Blue Bird: A Fairy Play in Six Acts" (1908)

 

     

“If the bee disappeared off the face of the earth,

man would only have four years left to live."


from The Life of the Bee (1901)

Friday
Aug292014

At-A-Site Theater an Artistic Highlight of Travellers to Asheville!

Travel Writer Corey Harvard wrote a charming review of At-A-Site Theater's "Celebrating the Birthday of Dead Writers" project on his Travel Site:  The Trip That Takes Us.  Corey enjoyed Monika's reading of a passage from "The Sun Also Rises" by Ernest Hemingway on Hemingway's birthday, July 21, 2014. He writes:

"I had stumbled upon Monika Gross, artistic director of At-A-Site Theater, a theater that happens directly on the streets. Their mission is to “bring meaning to space.”  For the whole of the summer, different members of the theater were setting up and reading from the works of dead authors. Monika treated me to a passage from The Sun Also Rises by Hemmingway.

Evangeline and Monika were bodied extensions of what I liked most about Asheville: unguarded, genuine accessibility. The city itself was an argument against the mainstream societal pressure to invest so much into appearances. Asheville didn’t want the pretty surfaces: its beauty worked from the inside out.

In the long run, I wonder if that’s how all true beauty works."

 

He included this video clip of the reading in his posting: